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Pioner Press April 16, 1975

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Date Issued:
1975-04-16
Summary:
Florida's Attorney General Robert Shevin visits Indian River State College in 1975. Mr. Shevin gave a short speech and then followed with a question and answer session. The topics included his reasons for Florida's rising crime rate, which he listed as tourism, growing population, open coastlines, unemployment, and the lack of rehabilitation when criminals are released from jail. During the question and answer sessions, he speculated on topics that included mass media reporting, legalization of marijuana, property line setbacks, and recent changes in the Supreme Court. Mr. Shevin concluded his Q & A with his thoughts on capital punishment, in which he stated he is in favor of the death penalty. Robert L. Shevin was Florida's Attorney General from 1971-1979. During his visit to Indian River State College in 1975, he was questioned on his opinion of the new Supreme Court ruling, allowing rape victims names to be released in the press. This ruling was decided in the Supreme Court case Cox Broadcasting Corp v. Cohn, just shy of a month before Shevin appeared at the College. A television reporter, employed by an appellant broadcasting station, during a news report of a rape case, released a deceased rape victim's name. The victim's father brought action against the broadcasting station, claiming his right to privacy had been violated. Martin Cohn, the victim's father, originally succeeded in court by suing WSB and the reporter, claiming it violated Georgia's shield law and his common-law right to privacy. Before the case could proceed at state trial court, the United States Supreme Court agreed to hear Cox's appeal. The Supreme Court ruled 8-1 in favor of Cox broadcasting, holding Georgia's shield law and its common-law counterpart violated the First Amendment. Since Cox's reporter obtained the name in a public document in open court, the court held that later publication was actively protected by the First Amendment. Summary and historical context provided by Jamie Cairns as part of Dr. Michelle Carrigan's Fall 2018 AMH2020.
Title: Pioner Press April 16, 1975.
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Name(s): Indian River State College
Type of Resource: mixed material
Issuance: serial
Date Issued: 1975-04-16
Publisher: Indian River State College
Place of Publication: Fort Pierce
Extent: 11x17, Newspaper
Language(s): English
Summary: Florida's Attorney General Robert Shevin visits Indian River State College in 1975. Mr. Shevin gave a short speech and then followed with a question and answer session. The topics included his reasons for Florida's rising crime rate, which he listed as tourism, growing population, open coastlines, unemployment, and the lack of rehabilitation when criminals are released from jail. During the question and answer sessions, he speculated on topics that included mass media reporting, legalization of marijuana, property line setbacks, and recent changes in the Supreme Court. Mr. Shevin concluded his Q & A with his thoughts on capital punishment, in which he stated he is in favor of the death penalty. Robert L. Shevin was Florida's Attorney General from 1971-1979. During his visit to Indian River State College in 1975, he was questioned on his opinion of the new Supreme Court ruling, allowing rape victims names to be released in the press. This ruling was decided in the Supreme Court case Cox Broadcasting Corp v. Cohn, just shy of a month before Shevin appeared at the College. A television reporter, employed by an appellant broadcasting station, during a news report of a rape case, released a deceased rape victim's name. The victim's father brought action against the broadcasting station, claiming his right to privacy had been violated. Martin Cohn, the victim's father, originally succeeded in court by suing WSB and the reporter, claiming it violated Georgia's shield law and his common-law right to privacy. Before the case could proceed at state trial court, the United States Supreme Court agreed to hear Cox's appeal. The Supreme Court ruled 8-1 in favor of Cox broadcasting, holding Georgia's shield law and its common-law counterpart violated the First Amendment. Since Cox's reporter obtained the name in a public document in open court, the court held that later publication was actively protected by the First Amendment. Summary and historical context provided by Jamie Cairns as part of Dr. Michelle Carrigan's Fall 2018 AMH2020.
Identifier: irsc_c_pp_0020 (IID)
Subject(s): College student newspapers and periodicals -- Fort Pierce, Fla. -- 21st Century
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/irsc/fd/irsc_c_pp_0020
Use and Reproduction: Owned by Indian River State College
Host Institution: IRSC