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Florida's Vanishing Wildlife.

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Date Issued:
1982-07
Scope and content:
The Florida landscape has undergone great changes since the turn of the century, when the ringing of sledge hammers on steel, like the new railroad tracks they gave rise to, pierced its virtually untouched wilderness. On the heels of the track-layers came myriads of settlers, in search of a better life in this land of awesome pine forests and broad rivers of sawgrass. As man set out to tame Florida with plow, axe, and gun, an untamable element emerged- the wildlife. As ancient forests were cut, residents such as the Ivory-billed Woodpecker and Black Bear retreated into a shrinking habitat of less than optimum quality. As wetlands were drained, the once large populations of Wood Storks and Everglade Kites saw their food source dry up. And as trainload after trainload of alligator hides rolled out of Florida bound for purse and shoe markets, the seemingly endless population of the awesome reptile almost ceased to exist.
Title: Florida's Vanishing Wildlife.
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Name(s): Hendry, Laurel Comella
Goodwin, Thomas M.
Labisky, Ronald F.
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Book
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1982-07
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 69 pages,illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language(s): English
Scope and content: The Florida landscape has undergone great changes since the turn of the century, when the ringing of sledge hammers on steel, like the new railroad tracks they gave rise to, pierced its virtually untouched wilderness. On the heels of the track-layers came myriads of settlers, in search of a better life in this land of awesome pine forests and broad rivers of sawgrass. As man set out to tame Florida with plow, axe, and gun, an untamable element emerged- the wildlife. As ancient forests were cut, residents such as the Ivory-billed Woodpecker and Black Bear retreated into a shrinking habitat of less than optimum quality. As wetlands were drained, the once large populations of Wood Storks and Everglade Kites saw their food source dry up. And as trainload after trainload of alligator hides rolled out of Florida bound for purse and shoe markets, the seemingly endless population of the awesome reptile almost ceased to exist.
Identifier: FI06021504 (IID), 1027010 (digitool), fiu:15830 (fedora), AAB9708QF
Note(s): Electronic reproduction. [Florida] : State University System of Florida, PALMM Project, 2006. Mode of access: World Wide Web. Electronic version created 2006, State University System of Florida.
Subject(s): Endangered species
Endangered species -- Florida
Wildlife conservation -- Florida
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/FI06021504.pdf
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/FI06021504.jpg
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
Host Institution: FIU