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Impact of fire exclusion and invasion of Schinus terebinthifolius on limestone rockland pine forests of southeastern Florida.

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Date Issued:
1981-10
Summary:
Exclusion of fire from stands of Pinus elliotti var. densa on limestone substrates of Dade County in southeastern Florida results in shading of the understory by native tropical hardwood tree species and eventual elimination of a rich herbaceous, light-requiring understory flora, including endemic and/or very rare species. The exotic tree Schinus terebinthifolius has extensively invaded most remaining rockland pine forests outside Everglades National Park. Once saplings of the invading Schinus reach 1 m in height, most are able to survive fire.
Title: Impact of fire exclusion and invasion of Schinus terebinthifolius on limestone rockland pine forests of southeastern Florida.
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Name(s): Loope, Lloyd L.
Dunevitz, Hannah L.
South Florida Research Center
PALMM (Project)
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Technical Report
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1981-10
Publisher: National Park Service, South Florida Research Center, Everglades National Park
Place of Publication: Homestead, Fla.
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 30 pages, maps,28 cm.
Language(s): English
Summary: Exclusion of fire from stands of Pinus elliotti var. densa on limestone substrates of Dade County in southeastern Florida results in shading of the understory by native tropical hardwood tree species and eventual elimination of a rich herbaceous, light-requiring understory flora, including endemic and/or very rare species. The exotic tree Schinus terebinthifolius has extensively invaded most remaining rockland pine forests outside Everglades National Park. Once saplings of the invading Schinus reach 1 m in height, most are able to survive fire.
Summary: Aided by rapid recovery from fire, Schinus comes to dominate the understory of the stand and hastens the shading out of herbaceous flora. Prescribed burning of pine stands at 5-year intervals within Everglades National Park has apparently largely prevented establishment of Schinus there. Eventual requirements for pine regeneration as the stands approach maturity may result in application of less frequent, more severe prescribed fires. If such a regime results in the expected accelerated Schinus invasion, use of herbicides on Schinus may be necessary to maintain the native pineland ecosystem.
Identifier: 56537630 (oclc), FI06458726 (IID), 1033709 (digitool), NRBIB:EVER-6900 (NPS Natural Resources Bibliography Number) (stock number), fiu:18982 (fedora), AAA6450QF
Note(s): Lloyd L. Loope and Vicki L. Dunevitz.
"October 1981."
Includes bibliographic references (p. 29-30).
Electronic reproduction. [Florida] : State University System of Florida, PALMM Project, 2004. (Everglades online collection) Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Internet connectivity; Web browser software; Adobe Acrobat Reader to view and print PDF files. Electronically reproduced by Florida International University from a technical report held in the Green Library at Florida International University, Miami.
Subject(s): Brazilian pepper tree
Pine -- Ecology -- Florida -- Everglades
Forest ecology -- Florida -- Everglades
Everglades -- 3090202
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/fi06458726.pdf
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/fi06458726.jpg
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
Host Institution: FIU
Has Part:
(OCoLC)08385894
Is Part of Series: Report (South Florida Research Center) ; T-645.
Is Part of Series: Everglades online collection.