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Litterfall in pinelands of Everglades National Park.

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Date Issued:
1985
Summary:
Litterfall was measured at 23 pineland sites in Long Pine Key Pine Island, Everglades National Park, during 1979, 1980, and 1981. Pine needle litter, at 70 percent of total litterfall, was the most important component. Another 25 percent of the total litterfall was composed of pine sticks, bark, and cones. The remaining litter consisted of leaves from the understory hardwoods and fronds of the herbaceous fern, Pteridium aquilinum. A significant (15%) increase of pine needle litter was observed in 1981 relative to 1980. A great deal of site-to-site variation in all components of litterfall was also found. The spatial variation in pine needle litter could be explained in part by differences in pine density and size among sites. This spatial variability in litterfall implies a corresponding variability in the rate of fuel accumulation which, in turn, implies that different areas in Long Pine Key are able to burn with different frequencies.
Title: Litterfall in pinelands of Everglades National Park.
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Name(s): Herndon, Alan
Taylor, Dale L.
South Florida Research Center
PALMM (Project)
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Technical Report
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1985
Publisher: Everglades National Park (Agency : U.S.). South Florida Research Center
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 41 pages,illustrations,maps,28 cm.
Language(s): English
Summary: Litterfall was measured at 23 pineland sites in Long Pine Key Pine Island, Everglades National Park, during 1979, 1980, and 1981. Pine needle litter, at 70 percent of total litterfall, was the most important component. Another 25 percent of the total litterfall was composed of pine sticks, bark, and cones. The remaining litter consisted of leaves from the understory hardwoods and fronds of the herbaceous fern, Pteridium aquilinum. A significant (15%) increase of pine needle litter was observed in 1981 relative to 1980. A great deal of site-to-site variation in all components of litterfall was also found. The spatial variation in pine needle litter could be explained in part by differences in pine density and size among sites. This spatial variability in litterfall implies a corresponding variability in the rate of fuel accumulation which, in turn, implies that different areas in Long Pine Key are able to burn with different frequencies.
Identifier: 56836322 (oclc), FI24638501 (IID), 1051462 (digitool), NRBIB:EVER-0810 (NPS Natural Resources Bibliography Number) (stock number), PB85-241214/XAB NTIS Accession Number (stock number), fiu:27242 (fedora), AAA6869QF
Note(s): Alan Herndon and Dale Taylor.
"March 1985."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 9).
Electronic reproduction. [Florida] : State University System of Florida, PALMM Project, 2004. (Everglades online collection) Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Internet connectivity; Web browser software; Adobe Acrobat Reader to view and print PDF files. Electronically reproduced by Florida International University from a technical report held in the Green Library at Florida International University, Miami.
Subject(s): Pine straw -- Florida -- Everglades National Park
Pine -- Florida -- Everglades National Park -- Physiology
Everglades -- 3090202
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/FI24638501.pdf
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/FI24638501.jpg
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
Host Institution: FIU
Has Part:
(OCoLC)12416697
Is Part of Series: Report (South Florida Research Center) ; SFRC-85/01.
Is Part of Series: Everglades online collection.