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Catastrophic Mortality of the Seagrass Thalassia Testudinum in Florida Bay: Annual Completion Report to Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, Office of Coastal Zone Management.

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Date Issued:
1990-12-21
Summary:
The report summarizes an investigation into the causes and repercussions of an unprecedented die-back of seagrass in Florida Bay. Morphometric characteristics of the affected grass beds are presented. Unusual growth characteristics were observed in the affected areas. It is suggested that cytotoxic levels of sediment sulfides may have contributed to synergistic role. It was observed that Halodula may outstrip Thalassia in the recovery process. Labyrinthula, a lime mold, has been associated with the die back. A conceptual model suggests that environmental stress and the pathogenic slime mold acted together to cause mortality.
Title: Catastrophic Mortality of the Seagrass Thalassia Testudinum in Florida Bay: Annual Completion Report to Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, Office of Coastal Zone Management.
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Name(s): Carlson, Paul Robins.
Florida Marine Research Institute
United States Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management.
Florida Office of Coastal Management
PALMM (Project)
Type of Resource: text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 1990-12-21
Publisher: Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Florida Marine Research Institute
Available through the National Technical Information Service
Place of Publication: St. Petersburg, Fla.
Physical Form: electronic resource
Extent: 52 pages, illustrations; 28 cm.
Language(s): English
Summary: The report summarizes an investigation into the causes and repercussions of an unprecedented die-back of seagrass in Florida Bay. Morphometric characteristics of the affected grass beds are presented. Unusual growth characteristics were observed in the affected areas. It is suggested that cytotoxic levels of sediment sulfides may have contributed to synergistic role. It was observed that Halodula may outstrip Thalassia in the recovery process. Labyrinthula, a lime mold, has been associated with the die back. A conceptual model suggests that environmental stress and the pathogenic slime mold acted together to cause mortality.
Identifier: 85891853 (oclc), FI05032510 (IID), 1004159 (digitool), PB91-241430/XAB NTIS Accession Number (stock number), fiu:5369 (fedora), AAA6865QF
Note(s): by Paul R. Carlson ... [et al].
"PB91-241430."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 17-20).
Electronic reproduction. [Florida] : State University System of Florida, PALMM Project, 2005. (Everglades online collection) Mode of access: World Wide Web. System requirements: Internet connectivity; Web browser software; Adobe Acrobat Reader to view and print PDF files. Electronically reproduced by Florida International University from a document held in the Green Library at Florida International University, Miami.
This project was supported by a grant from the Florida Office of Coastal Management, Department of Environmental Regulation
Sponsored by U.S. Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, OCRM NA89AA-D-CZ 228
Annual completion report; Oct. 1, 1989-Sept. 30, 1990.
Subject(s): Seagrass dieback -- Florida -- Florida Bay
Thalassia -- Florida -- Florida Bay
Coastal zone management -- Florida -- Florida Bay
Florida Bay (Fla.)
Florida Bay-Florida Keys -- 3090203
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/FI05032510.pdf
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fcla/tc/feol/FI05032510.jpg
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/
Host Institution: FIU
Has Part:
(OCoLC)32443043
Is Part of Series: Everglades online collection.